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New paper published on The Journal of Geoethics and Social Geosciences!


The inaugural Earth Day celebratory crowd on Fifth Avenue in New York City on 22 April 1970 (from TIME)
Banner of the Journal of Geoethics and Social Geosciences

The Journal of Geoethics and Social Geoscience published a new open access article on 9 May 2024.

We remind you that this journal is diamond open access and is supported by the IAPG. No Article Processing Charge (APC) is requested to authors and no fee to readers.


The new article can be cited as follows:


Koster E., Gibbard P. and Maslin M. (2024). The Anthropocene Event as a Cultural Zeitgeist in the Earth-Human Ecosystem. Journal of Geoethics and Social Geosciences, 1(1), 1–41. https://doi.org/10.13127/jgsg-43


Abstract:

In 2000-2002 a climate scientist and limnologist recommended that the Anthropocene become a human-influenced Geological Time Scale addition. In 2009 an Anthropocene Working Group was mandated by the International Commission on Stratigraphy’s Subcommission of Quaternary Stratigraphy to investigate it. Developments unfolded in several phases. In 2015 as Future Earth announced an acceleration of Earth System and socioeconomic trends since the mid-20th century, the Working Group anticipated that mid-20th century atomic bomb testing fallout would define the base of a new Anthropocene epoch, an approach it affirmed in 2019. During 2022-2023 it coordinated a search for an optimal Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point and another group of geoscientists announced a different Anthropocene definition focused on the intensifying impacts of humanity on environments and climates since the Late Pleistocene. In March 2024 the Working Group’s proposal was declined by the Subcommission, a decision ratified by both the Commission and International Union of Geological Sciences. Manifesting the pure to applied transformation of the geoscience profession with its commitment to ethical approaches, the Anthropocene Event’s dovetailed geological, archaeological and historical realities offer a stimulus for an Earth-human ecosystem mindset, a zeitgeist integrating nature and humanity, and governance of the polycrisis with new partnerships.


Keywords:

Applied geoscience, Earth-Human Ecosystem, Anthropocene Event, Cultural zeitgeist, Earth governance


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